Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Anyone experiencing an unplanned pregnancy, particularly for the first time, is going to have a lot of questions. Below, we have included some of the most common things women in your position ask themselves before visiting our offices. Of course, this list is by no means exhaustive, and we would be happy to answer any and all additional questions you may have.

How much does my appointment cost?

All appointments with Women’s Resource Medical Center of Southern Nevada are free. You are under no obligation to pay for anything, and insurance is not required. All you need to bring is some form of identification.

What if I’m unsure of how I want to proceed with my pregnancy?

Not having made a final decision is okay and completely normal. That is part of why we are here for you — to help you along in that decision-making process. Our staff can provide you with the information and resources you need to make a healthy, informed decision.

Can I visit you if I’m under 18?

Regardless of your age, Women’s Resource Medical Center of Southern Nevada will happily provide you with our free and confidential services. Just because you are under 18 does not mean that you have no say in what should happen to your body, regardless of what others — particularly parents or other authority figures — have to say.

Will anyone find out about my appointment?

One of Women’s Resource Medical Center of Southern Nevada’s core beliefs is that everyone we see has a right to privacy. Therefore, we do not share your information with anyone, including your parents.

Can I bring someone with me to my appointment?

Yes, you are more than welcome to have someone present at your appointment, whether that is a friend, family member or significant other. However, due to HIPAA laws, there will be select times during your appointment when your companion may be asked to briefly leave the room.

Do I need to have my parents with me?

You do not need to have your parents with you. All you need to bring is some form of identification.

What are the health risks of having an abortion?

The reported risks of a surgical procedure may include bleeding, infection, infertility, and complications with future pregnancies (i.e., incompetent cervix). There may be other risks, including emotional difficulties. It is best to seek medical advice before proceeding with any abortion procedure.

How are abortions done?

Abortions can be performed through the use of medications, surgery, or a combination of both to end a pregnancy. The method depends on how far along in the pregnancy you are, and your medical history.

Abortions during early pregnancy, before 9 weeks, can be done with medications. Abortions between 9 and 14 weeks usually are done surgically, although medications may be used to help soften and open the cervix.

After 14 weeks, abortions can be done using labor-inducing medications that cause uterine contractions or by using these medicines in combination with surgery.

Where can I get a free pregnancy test?

If you are concerned you may be pregnant, you can contact Women’s Resource Medical Centers of Southern Nevada and schedule an appointment to receive a free pregnancy test.

If I have an abortion, will my baby feel pain?

At about eight weeks a fetus can feel pain. It is at this point in their development that the following necessary structures are in place: sensory nerves (which detect pain), the thalamus (the part of the brain that receives pain messages from sensory nerves), and motor nerves (which are directed by the mind to pull away from the hurt). Also, by 13 1/2 to 14 weeks, the entire body surface, except for the back and the top of the head, are sensitive to pain.

Where can I get information on abortion?

For information on types of procedures and the risks that coincide, please contact our office and we can review them with you.

What are the health risks of having an abortion?

The reported risks of a surgical procedure may include bleeding, infection, infertility, and complications with future pregnancies (i.e., incompetent cervix). There may be other risks, including emotional difficulties. It is best to seek medical advice before proceeding with any abortion procedure.

Should I be concerned about having an abortion?

Abortion is not just a simple medical procedure. For many women, it is a life-changing event with significant physical, emotional and spiritual consequences. Most women who struggle with past abortions indicated that there was a lack of medically accurate information on the abortion procedures and side-effects available to them at the time they were considering it for themselves.